The Seamonsters- Wonderland

When I think of The Seamonsters I think of six, Doc Martin-wearing young girls, fresh out of Sheffield, coated in glitter and generally having a bloody great time on stage and playing music together, and at least by the end of 2017, you all should be thinking the same. Today marks the day of the release of their brand spanking new track Wonderland on Twin Records. The girls start the track as they mean to go on, with an echoing retro sounding guitar riff, continuing this throughout the track but making it a heavier electric sound as the track goes on. It is clear that the band have been influenced by the likes of Black Honey with the same amount of sass, bass and electric guitar. It is very refreshing to see a group of young girls taking up a rocky sound as it is something that the music industry is certainly lacking. The single is out from today, 21st July. It is certainly not one to miss.

Ciircus Street- ‘Mouth Like That’

Album Review: ‘Interplanetary Class Classics’ by The Moonlandingz

When I first heard Fat White Family’s debut album Champagne Holocaust, four years ago, I knew that I was listening to the most important band of that time. Heavily influenced by The Fall and The Country Teasers – the Fat Whites created an album, that certainly lyrically, was much more interesting than anything else at the time.

As well as the electric live shows, the band’s follow up: ‘Songs For Our Mothers’ cemented their status as the most interesting band in the UK. So when I discovered the songwriting partnership of the South London band, singer Lias Saoudi and guitarist Saul Adamczewski, had begun a side project, I was eager to find out what other musical interests they were influenced by.

Saoudi, who adopts the alter ego of fictional narcissist Jonny Rocket on the album, and Adamczewski, have teamed up with Sheffield electro-duo, Eccentronic Research Council, to create The Moonlandingz’ synth-pop driven debut album Interplanetary Class Classics. The album also features Yoko Ono, whose son and friend of the band, Sean, deploys psychedelic guitar on the track ‘Sweet Saturn Mine’. Rebecca Taylor of Snow Club, drummer Ross Orton, bassist Mairead O’Connor and Randy Jones, the cowboy from The Village People, complete the line-up.

The album opener ‘Vessels’ begins with heavy drumming and Saoudi’s low vocals drenched with fuzzy guitar that eventually leads to the front-man returning to the voice that served him so well on Fat Whites’ debut in the chorus. Like ‘Vessels’, tracks such as ‘Sweet Saturn Mine’ and ‘Black Hanz’ are undeniably catchy pop tunes, where the lyrics apply the same sinister, ironic outlook Saoudi has used many times. For example, in ‘I.D.S’, written about everyone’s favourite bastard Iain Duncan Smith, Saoudi expresses his displeasure at Duncan’s policies, singing: “40,000 years of job club.”

Saoudi channels his inner Lou Reed on the album’s best track, ‘The Strangle Of Anna’, paying homage to Reed’s New York band with they lyric: “I made you listen to Sunday morning, you spit it out across the parquet flooring.” The song also has elements of The Velvet Underground’s ‘I’ll Be Your Mirror’, with Rebecca Taylor’s impressive PJ Harvey-like vocals. The Moonlandingz wrap it up with Yoko Ono wailing on the electronically-led ‘The Cities Undone’, which also features The Human League’s Phil Oakey.

This album, musically, doesn’t offer anything too original, but nothing does these days, it seems fairly impossible. But in an era where most popular music makes me want to die, it’s refreshing to see the likes of Saoudi not pretending to be a wild original or taking himself too seriously. And much like the Fat Whites, The Moonlandingz’ debut is lyrically, heads and shoulders above the majority of the landfill-indie that occupies popular guitar music today.

Joe Forte

Atticus emerges from the underground with ‘These Walls’

Emerging into the fray of contemporary electronic music is singer-songwriter, Atticus. With a powerful electronic sound, combined with an indie aesthetic, Atticus seems to already have cracked the recipe for modern music that breaks boundaries and offers something just a little different.

Over his career as a musician, Atticus has played around with a number of genres but has found a home for his raspy, yet enticing vocals in the electronic category.

The new single ‘These Walls’ is a track that breaks out, both sonically and metaphorically from anything you’ve heard before, blending an ambient James Blake like atmosphere with swelling bass lines and evocative, jarring beats.

After unfortunately losing his Mother at the tender age of 16, Atticus is a songwriter who channels his emotions into his music and the result is a form of intriguing music with a meaningful background too.

‘These Walls’ is out for release 24th March 2017.

Find out more on Atticus here:

Links:

https://soundcloud.com/officialatticus

https://www.facebook.com/officialATTICUS

‘Blue Moon’- The New Single From Kid Cupid

The female fronted indie-electronic group, Kid Cupid, are back with their storming new single, ‘Blue Moon’.

Picking up from where the band left off with ‘Broken Down’, ‘Blue Moon’ is superbly crafted amalgamation of synth bass, echoing vocals and even a touch of cornet. The band have an affinity for showcasing their vocal harmonies alongside their fusion of acoustic and electronic beats.

‘Blue Moon’ was written in a particularly picturesque moment as vocalist Laura Shaw was watching the sun set over a river in India. The sheer beauty of the place inspired Laura to think about the interactions we have between each other, fleeting moments that we have every day. We may never see these people that we encounter ever again, but this is what is addressed in the band’s new song – an original songwriting inspiration to say the least.

After forming just over a year ago, Kid Cupid have built a reputation for themselves as a captivating live act and this has led to them being compared to the likes of London Grammar and Chvrches.

Kid Cupid’s social commentary based songs set them apart from a lot of artifical indie artists and ‘Blue Moon’ is no different. Definitely well worth a listen.

 

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/kidcupidmusic/

https://twitter.com/kidcupidmusic

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6p05P14pXA

https://www.instagram.com/wearekidcupid/

Eden Royals Set For New Release

If you love your indie music and haven’t heard of Eden Royals yet, then you’re in for a treat. The Essex based band make a wonderfully funky and infectious brand of indie-guitar pop that oozes that British home-grown music quality.

The group haven’t had a release for a while now, since they’ve been touring in America with platinum selling band, Third Eye Blind, but now they’ve returned with more experience to release their new single ‘Time Won’t Wait’ on March 10th, which is taken from the EP of the same name.

Eden Royals consists of Lloyd Buck, John Ryder, Kenny Cole and Sean Quigley, and the boys have varying musical backgrounds. John used to be in a Beatles tribute band called The Day Trippers, whilst Lloyd had featured in music videos for Paul McCartney and Pete Doherty. They have all brought their relevant experience to the band and the result is one of chemistry and powerful dynamics that make them one to watch for the future.

They’ve even played at Liverpool’s Sound City festival where they shared a stage with King Krule, Bastille and Peace and the Daily Mirror voted them as one of their top bands.

Although the single isn’t out until next month, you can listen to some of the band’s previous work here, including the catchy track ‘Close To The Sun’.

Links

www.facebook.com/edenroyals

www.twitter.com/edenroyals

Happyness and Felix White Team Up For Live Sessions

Indie lovers will rejoice when they hear that London based Indie youngsters, Happyness, joined up with Felix White of The Maccabees for their Yala! Sessions version of their single, ‘Tunnel Vision On Your Part’.

Yala Records was in fact set up by White following the split of the Maccabees and they are beginning to work with small growing acts for a label/club night.

The tune is a real grower and takes a while to build up, but it’s well worth the wait once the overdriven guitars kick in, contrasted with the pleasing piano hook.