Pink Milk’s “Purple” Reviewed

If you didn’t know any better, you’d swear that there were at least four people playing on this, Pink Milk’s debut album, Purple. In fact, there are but two, Maria Forslund (vocals, drums) and Edward Forslund (guitars, bass), both of whom use every effects pedal they can to tweak up the volume that extra notch and get it to echo that little longer.

Opener, “River Phoenix”, sets the scene perfectly – ice-cold moodiness with the threat of malevolent showers, there are no words but the intention is clear. Appropriately, their muscles are flexed further on “Muscles”, Mariah’s breathy tones swooping over enormous guitar chords and a slowly stomping dinosaur footstep of a drum beat.

“Detroit” sees Pink Milk at their version of breakneck speed, which is any other guitar band’s slow number being played at 33rpm instead of 45rpm. The accompanying video is a nice counterpoint to the track – hazy and happy, yet oddly haunting. “Kill 4 U”, perhaps the strongest track on the album, has a Depeche Mode-esque dark majesty to it, the guitar work is genuinely thrilling, showcasing an instrument taken for granted but still capable of astonishing.

“LA Cop” is something of a welcome instrumental pause for breath – the echoes suggest huge amounts of space, yet the overall sound is strangely claustrophobic. “Awakening of Laura” is pushed out of the way quickly by “Sushi Dreams (Flesh & Blood)”, which is every bit as terrifying as it looks on paper – in fact, although causal listeners will point fingers excitedly at My Bloody Valentine and The Cranes as precursors, this reminded me very much of electro-rock innovators, Chrome, and their starkly cruel thrash.

“Drommens Skepp” and “Sans Toi” pick up the pace yet further, really bringing the tracks together as an album, as opposed to a collection of assembled, random tracks. It feels like the whole album has been dragging us towards something; which, in turns out, it has. Their cover of Foreigner’s “I Want to Know What Love is” is a slap around the face of the band’s AOR chops and reinvents it as a mournful, epitaph-like statement. Purple takes time to fall in love with but the effort is well worth the investment.

Links:

SoundCloud:

https://soundcloud.com/pinkmilktheband

Spotify:

https://open.spotify.com/artist/6pfkVhn2nBIYUEu9nKHdLV

Youtube Channel:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvRWoJAz6IGcGmuw3qqah9A

Facebook:

 https://www.facebook.com/pinkmilkmusic/

Twitter:

https://twitter.com/pm_theband

Instagram:

https://www.instagram.com/pinkmilkmusic/

Website:

http://www.pinkmilkmusic.com

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Neo-Victorian Music Hall from Steampunk Records

You’ve read the books; you’ve donned the garb; now, attached gas-powered hot-air balloons to your ears and catch the remainder of the Steam Punk Record Label tour of the UK. With more bands than you can shake a pair of goggles at, it’s a perfect opportunity to immerse yourself in the magical world of future/past and forget about the present for a few hours.

 

 

 

Video: ‘Go Your Way’ by Voldo Blanka

Canadian electronic artist Voldo Blanka is here with his latest single ‘Go Your Way’ and the beautifully shot accompanying video. Having formally been part of blues rock band Head of the Herd, Voldo, otherwise known as Neu, is taking a detour into the world of electronic music which he clearly has a knack for!

Check out more on Voldo Blanka here:

Links:

Soundcloud: https://tinyurl.com/yczk5ewq

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/voldoblanka/?hc_ref=SEARCH&fref=nf

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/voldoblanka/?hl=en

 

iTunes: http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1249391410?ls=1&app=itunes

Apple Music: http://itunes.apple.com/album/id1249391410

Spotify: https://open.spotify.com/album/2MvcF5DBabvLO0VE1EFduG

Temper Cartel- Babysitter

temper-cartel.png

Indie four-piece have just released a new single ‘Babysitter’, jam packed with attitude. It has a perfectly put together intro with vocals comparable to the The Black Keys with a hint of The Kooks (you’ll see what I mean..). . The blend of delicate and gruff guitar riffs, that are becoming a signature sound for Temper Cartel, is clear in this track and it complimented by the heavier vocals and catchy repetition  “down down down and get lost in the sound”.

Temper Cartel are known for their political and literature influences and in this track you can see this from the metaphorical devices cleverly used by front-man Josh, who seems to intertwine them in all the band’s tracks, “I don’t need a babysitter” relates to a controlling government, regarding the frustration of the last general election. For the video to accompany this track, they recruited 40 fans to make the child-esque trantrum style video.

Made up of Danny Fisher (lead guitar/arrangements), Josh Alden (rhythm/lead vocal/lyricist), Sam Alden (drums) and Everton Barbato (bass guitar), Temper Cartel have support from the likes of BBC6 Music and BBC Introducing as well as numerous indie music magazines. They have recently played with The Strypes and The Bluetones certainly making them a band to watch this upcoming year.

 

Links:

https://tempercartel.com/

https://soundcloud.com/tempercartel

https://en-gb.facebook.com/tempercartel/

https://twitter.com/tempercartel?lang=en

https://www.instagram.com/tempercartel/

Whiskey + Rock’n’roll = Albino

It’s common knowledge that most rock bands like to indulge in a little alcohol therapy from time to time, but vintage folk-rockers Albino perhaps enjoy this more than anyone else, fuelling their rock’n’roll sound with whiskey.

Labelling themselves as ‘London’s greatest alcoholic garage rock band (probably)’, four piece folk-rock band Albino are on the road to releasing their latest album, Night At The Chemist, from which their new retro-infused single, ‘Belinda’, is taken.

‘Belinda’ could be straight out of the 60s with its organ-led sound and noodling guitar solo, whilst lead singer and guitarist, Ben Tucker’s vocals power the track (along with the whiskey) in a rather amusing narrative which is mirrored in the video through the beautiful medium of lego.

Since their inception in 2005, Albino has undergone a musical metamorphosis, travelling a long way from their humble beginnings, but now, the off-the-wall band has cemented their style and truly found their own sound. Whilst Albino’s eclectic and multi-talented musical line up has changed over the years, their musical direction, commitment and energy has always remained constant.

As the band have stated: ‘We may not change the world with our music, but we’ll definitely leave a scar.’

 

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/Albinomusic/

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCYeh0Lung8nhaCa1Zb5W8cw

http://www.albinomusic.com/index.php

Pluto Jonze- ‘Swingin’ Like I’m Bowie’

Pluto Jonze

As a tribute to his idol David Bowie, psych-pop sensation Pluto Jonze has released the track ‘Swingin’ Like I’m Bowie’. The Australian artist has been around the music scene since 2012 but is looking to expand his audience to across the world, having not released a track for three years, what better time is there to tribute his, and millions of other’s absolute idol? On Bowie, Pluto Jonze commented “Last year sucked, I couldn’t listen to any of his songs without this sadness pinching me. Anyways, I’m over that and can now appreciate with clear eyes how he wanted his art to transcend himself and live on. He pushed the artistic envelope right to the end and this song is a celebration of that intent.”

Obviously there is strong Bowie influences in this track, however the groovy, psych-pop chorus screams Beck’s track ‘Dreams’ at us it in the best way possible. Jonze considers himself to be within the pop genre, but his strong melodies and hooks, often driven by psychedelic production elements and lyrics make his sound stand out from that classic ‘pop’ sound. His pop-punky voice complements the funky guitar throughout the track as well as the more rocky riffs embedded. I’m sure the way he sings “Bowieeeeeeee” with such conviction along with attitude will remain playing round and round in your head for at least the next day.

You can catch Pluto Jonze in the UK at the following dates:

Sun 6 Aug – The Islington, London

Tue 8 Aug – The Islington, London

Wed 23 Aug – The Portland Arms, Cambridge

 

Links:

https://www.facebook.com/plutojonze/?ref=br_rs

https://twitter.com/PlutoJonze

https://www.instagram.com/plutojonze/?hl=en

Album Review: ‘Interplanetary Class Classics’ by The Moonlandingz

When I first heard Fat White Family’s debut album Champagne Holocaust, four years ago, I knew that I was listening to the most important band of that time. Heavily influenced by The Fall and The Country Teasers – the Fat Whites created an album, that certainly lyrically, was much more interesting than anything else at the time.

As well as the electric live shows, the band’s follow up: ‘Songs For Our Mothers’ cemented their status as the most interesting band in the UK. So when I discovered the songwriting partnership of the South London band, singer Lias Saoudi and guitarist Saul Adamczewski, had begun a side project, I was eager to find out what other musical interests they were influenced by.

Saoudi, who adopts the alter ego of fictional narcissist Jonny Rocket on the album, and Adamczewski, have teamed up with Sheffield electro-duo, Eccentronic Research Council, to create The Moonlandingz’ synth-pop driven debut album Interplanetary Class Classics. The album also features Yoko Ono, whose son and friend of the band, Sean, deploys psychedelic guitar on the track ‘Sweet Saturn Mine’. Rebecca Taylor of Snow Club, drummer Ross Orton, bassist Mairead O’Connor and Randy Jones, the cowboy from The Village People, complete the line-up.

The album opener ‘Vessels’ begins with heavy drumming and Saoudi’s low vocals drenched with fuzzy guitar that eventually leads to the front-man returning to the voice that served him so well on Fat Whites’ debut in the chorus. Like ‘Vessels’, tracks such as ‘Sweet Saturn Mine’ and ‘Black Hanz’ are undeniably catchy pop tunes, where the lyrics apply the same sinister, ironic outlook Saoudi has used many times. For example, in ‘I.D.S’, written about everyone’s favourite bastard Iain Duncan Smith, Saoudi expresses his displeasure at Duncan’s policies, singing: “40,000 years of job club.”

Saoudi channels his inner Lou Reed on the album’s best track, ‘The Strangle Of Anna’, paying homage to Reed’s New York band with they lyric: “I made you listen to Sunday morning, you spit it out across the parquet flooring.” The song also has elements of The Velvet Underground’s ‘I’ll Be Your Mirror’, with Rebecca Taylor’s impressive PJ Harvey-like vocals. The Moonlandingz wrap it up with Yoko Ono wailing on the electronically-led ‘The Cities Undone’, which also features The Human League’s Phil Oakey.

This album, musically, doesn’t offer anything too original, but nothing does these days, it seems fairly impossible. But in an era where most popular music makes me want to die, it’s refreshing to see the likes of Saoudi not pretending to be a wild original or taking himself too seriously. And much like the Fat Whites, The Moonlandingz’ debut is lyrically, heads and shoulders above the majority of the landfill-indie that occupies popular guitar music today.

Joe Forte